Events & Exhibitions » Current Exhibitions

Current Exhibitions

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning

April 13, 2014 through May 30, 2016

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning highlights the Museum’s extensive collection of Southwestern turquoise jewelry and presents all aspects of the stone, from geology, mining and history, to questions of authenticity and value.

People in the Southwest have used turquoise for jewelry and ceremonial purposes and traded valuable stones both within and outside the region for over a thousand years. Turquoise, Water, Sky presents hundreds of necklaces, bracelets, belts, rings, earrings, silver boxes and other objects illustrating how the stone was used and its deep significance to the people of the region. This comprehensive consideration of the stone runs through May 2, 2016.

View the online version of the exhibition at http://turquoise.indianartsandculture.org




Large single cabochons and clusters of smaller stones on bracelets and rings
Large single cabochons and clusters of smaller but precisely cut stone ornament Southwestern bracelets and rings. These pieces of jewelry date from the 1910s to the present and show turquoise at its best. (Courtesy of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology. Photograph by Kitty Leaken.)



BOX
Box, 1920s, Navajo. Silver, turquoise. Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology (56683/12). Photograph by Blair Clark.



"Fake" Turquoise
To the Native American it is the turquoise color that carries all the power and references to sky, water, birth, health. The stone does not necessarily have to be used for ritual or decoration. These pieces dating from 800-1200AD are wood painted to resemble turquoise. Given the scarcity of turquoise and the difficulty mining the fragile stone with primitive tools these three pieces are not fake in the eyes of a Native American.



Ketoh (Bow Guard)
Ketohs, or bow guards, were traditionally worn to protect an archer’s arm from the sting of a released bowstring; today, they are worn as decoration. This ketoh (circa 1912) pairs two glass cabochons with one of real turquoise. So-called Hubbell glass was imported into the region during a period when turquoise was difficult to acquire. Artists used it because it had the right color, but tourists rejected it as “fake.” (Courtesy of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology. Photograph by Kitty Leaken.)