Events & Exhibitions » Current Exhibitions

Current Exhibitions

Landscape of an Artist: Living Treasure Dan Namingha

 

March 20, 2016 through September 11, 2016

Public Opening on Sunday, March 20, 2016 Screening of Dan Namingha: Seeking Center in Two Worlds at 1:00p.m. Q&A with Dan Namingha at 2:00p.m. Every year at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture’s Native Treasures: Indian Arts Festival, the museum chooses to honor an artist as a MIAC Living Treasure. This year, Dan Namingha (Hopi-Tewa) is being honored as the MIAC Living Treasure and 2016 Native Treasures Featured Artist. Born and raised on the Hopi reservation, Dan Namingha’s work is inspired by the Southwest region and subjects within his culture. For the past five decades his work has continuously evolved as he has refined his studio practice by experimenting with different mediums and techniques.  Throughout this evolution, Namingha has employed alterations and abstractions to give the viewer a mere impression or glimpse of the subjects and landscapes.  This process allows him to share sacred aspects of his culture in familiar forms with the public, while still protecting the sanctity of his Hopi and Tewa culture. Namingha’s work has garnered praise and has been well received on both the national and international art scene at numerous exhibitions. This March, MIAC invites you to help us honor Namingha’s achievements and explore the Landscape of an Artist: Living Treasure Dan Namingha.

The Life and Art of Innovative Native American Artist and Designer Lloyd Kiva New

 

February 14, 2016 through December 30, 2016

This year is the centennial of the birth of seminal Native American artist Lloyd Kiva New, and three Santa Fe arts institutions are celebrating this anniversary in style. Locally, New, a Cherokee, is known as the Institute of American Indian Art’s (IAIA) first artistic director, yet nationally, Native people refer to him as the "Godfather of Native Fashion." Museum of Indian Arts and Culture’s career retrospective A New Century: The Life and Legacy of Cherokee Artist and Educator Lloyd "Kiva" New (February 14 through December 30, 2016). A New Century is a mesmerizing look into New’s storied life from his humble beginnings on the family farm in Oklahoma to the burgeoning days at IAIA. In between he strides the decks of the USS Sanborn during World War II and the halls of the Art Institute of Chicago. Opening successive and successful boutiques and craft centers in the gleaming post-war enclave of Scottsdale, Arizona. New was a pioneer in the worlds of fashion, entrepreneurship, and Native art instruction. His vision of cultural studies and creative arts education continues to influence and inspire. Through personal recollections, photos, archival documents, and objects pour la couture, New Century: The Life and Legacy of Cherokee Artist and Educator Lloyd "Kiva" New reviews the life of this American Indian visionary. The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, and the New Mexico Museum of Art will each present an exhibition in 2016 focusing on key aspects of Lloyd Kiva New’s (b. 1916 - d. 2002) significant contributions to contemporary Native culture. Additionally, the three institutions are planning a symposium, multiple lectures, panel discussions, a fashion show, Gala, and, as pure celebration, a 100th birthday party.

Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography, and Time

 

October 25, 2015 through May 25, 2017

For the first time in Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography, and Time, large prints of Heisey’s stunning images will be paired directly with the Lindberghs’. The exhibition opens October 25, 2015 and runs through May 2017 at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture. During 2007 and 2008, flying at alarmingly low altitudes and slow speeds, Adriel Heisey leaned out the door of his light plane, and holding his camera with both hands, re-photographed some of the Southwest’s most significant archaeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his new bride Anne photographed in 1929.

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning

 

April 13, 2014 through May 30, 2016

Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning highlights the Museum’s extensive collection of Southwestern turquoise jewelry and presents all aspects of the stone, from geology, mining and history, to questions of authenticity and value. Hundreds of necklaces, bracelets, belts, rings, earrings, silver boxes and other objects illustrate the stone’s use and its deep significance to the people of the region.  

The Buchsbaum Gallery of Southwestern Pottery

 

On long-term display

The Buchsbaum Gallery features each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona in a selection of pieces that represent the development of a community tradition. In addition, a changing area of the gallery, entitled Traditions Today highlights the evolving contemporary traditions of the ancient art of pottery making.

Here, Now and Always

 

On long-term display

Here, Now, and Always is a major exhibition based on eight years of collaboration among Native American elders, artists, scholars, teachers, writers and museum professionals. Voices of fifty Native Americans guide visitors through the Southwest's indigenous communities and their challenging landscapes. More than 1,300 artifacts from the Museum's collections are displayed accompanied by poetry, story, song and scholarly discussion.